The Bombings

From 1941 to 1944, Lowestoft, with its port and naval base for motor torpedo boats, was a prime target for the German Air force. The following table summarizes the deaths and casualties resulting from these bombings, which peaked in 1942, killing civilians and military alike.
Year
Civilians killed
Service personnel killed
Civilians injured
Service personnel injured
1941....
71
28
266
70
1942....
74
19
154
33
1943....
22
16
53
14
1944....
0
0
0
1
As acts of terrorism they are examples of small-town events which took place on all sides of the conflict throughout the war. The four high explosive bombs released by an isolated Dornier which dive-bombed the main shopping centre of London Road at tea time on 13th January 1942, demonstrate what front-line communities like Lowestoft experienced at the peak of the conflict. It was the worst raid on the town, killing in a few seconds 51 civilians and 19 service personnel and injuring 92 civilians and 22 military. A block of seven large shops was destroyed. The biggest casualty list was associated with the restaurant of Waller's department store, where, because there was no warning of the raid, only a few members of staff and patrons were able to get to the concrete shelter at the rear of the building. Waller & Sons was a grocers, restaurant, wine merchants and confectioners occupying 88 and 90 London Rd.

In summary, there were 90 air raids when bombs were dropped on the town and another 96 where bombs fell, for the most part relatively harmlessly, on the surrounding villages and fields.